Springing into warm weather!

Hello again, River Bend friends! As you have probably noticed, Spring has sprung and we are really enjoying all the changes that are happening here. Many snakes and frogs are waking from their winter naps – if you walk by Prairie Pond or Upper Pond, you can hear the frogs croaking!  There are so many new birds out and about, and they are all singing at the top of their lungs and hurrying to make nests in the forest, prairie, and pond alike. We have even seen Turkey Vultures, and though they neglect to sing, they are another sign that the warm weather is back.

Spring is a wonderful time to look up and take notes of the phenology of our area. Phenology is the study of the timing of natural events from year to year, and is really cool to discover – here at River Bend, we have a monthly Phenology board, where our visitors can come and write what they saw while out on the trails, and then this gets recorded and we can compare to several previous years. We also have a great book written by our founder, Orwin Rustad, which is a recording of 50 years of natural events!

phenology book

Orwin Rustad’s A Journal of Natural Events in Southeastern Minnesota, a fantastic phenology read.

To give you an example of phenology, I’ll tell you what his book says about the timing of Turkey Vulture spring arrivals: over 12 years of recording their comings and goings, the earliest they arrived was March 12th, and the latest was May 30th! Their average though is April 14th-17th, so they are a bit early this year.

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Turkey Vultures are a fun bird to spot during the spring and summer; they spend their time soaring high, looking like they are rocking back and forth in the wind on their  V-shaped wings.

One of the reasons phenology is important is that it helps us note changes through time. The reason I chose to look up the Turkey Vulture (other than the fact that they are amazing birds!) was that they were not very common birds in this area 50 and 60 years ago. Most of their sightings started in the 80’s and 90’s, perhaps indicating that Turkey Vultures were expanding their ranges in that time frame to include this area! If you are ever in the interpretive center and want to know more about the natural history of this area, check out this interesting book.

You can also take advantage of the gorgeous weather forecast and come for a hike and see the spring changes for yourself. Just today, school groups spotted Garter Snakes over by Honor Point, a Bald Eagle over the Strait River, and saw the turtles that have come out at Turtle Pond too! There are also tons of frogs and birds to see and listen to, so come to River Bend, explore, and then come contribute to our Phenology board.

phenology board

As you can see, River Bend visitors have already seen some amazing sights, and we’re only a week in to April! Come add your own observations!

After hearing the frogs start up around town or here at River Bend, are you curious to learn more? Then come to our awesome program on Saturday, April 15th: Fabulous Frogs! Hop on over to learn about what’s jumping around River Bend’s ponds – We’ll be learning about what makes Frogs so unique, creating our own frog chorus, as well as meeting our two froggy Animal Ambassadors! The program fee is just $5/person, $15/family ($3/member, $10/member family), and it runs from 10-1130, so come make a day of it here at River Bend – see the program and then go for your own hike!

Hope to see you soon!

~Katie

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Come learn all about Leopard Frogs and others at our Fabulous Frogs Program on Saturday April 15th from 10-11:30!

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Visitors at bird feeders: Windows on the Wild!

Saturday mornings are often the highlight of the week: whether you’re looking forward to sleeping in, watching TV, having a big family breakfast, or coming to River Bend for a hike, there’s always something exciting to look forward to! This last Saturday, February 4, we had our monthly Bagels & Birds free event, a great time to come to River Bend Nature Center for yummy bagels and cream cheese, coffee and cocoa, and a chance to watch some wildlife through our Windows on the Wild.

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Forgive the poor quality, but here’s a photo of a Cardinal and a Red-Bellied Woodpecker reluctantly sharing the feeder.

I had a great time chatting with the visitors, and listening to the kids pointing out all the birds and squirrels they saw. The adults had a good time relaxing and talking while identifying the birds that came to the feeder, and there were a lot of great sightings! We saw beautiful male and female Cardinals, plenty of Chickadees, Downy, Hairy, and Red-Bellied Woodpeckers chasing each other around, several Juncos searching the ground for good seeds, Nuthatches climbing upside down on the feeders, and even a Blue Jay, who was super focused on finding the peanuts! We also saw several plump squirrels, including both the smaller Grey squirrels and the bigger reddish orange Fox squirrel!

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A very curious Downy Woodpecker.

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This Downy Woodpecker was really happy I refilled the suet feeder!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

All of these sightings were great, and it was fun to watch the birds come and go with their treats, and it got even more exciting about half an hour in: one of the guests noticed that the birds were coming for food less frequently, and many were perched in the trees, unmoving. He mused that maybe there was a hawk nearby, so we all started looking; soon, we spotted what looked to be a raptor off in the top of a distant tree! Within a minute of continuing to watch the shape, it suddenly took off and came straight towards the feeders! It must have realized everyone knew it was coming, because it did not catch anything and instead flew up over the building in defeat. But we all kept our eyes searching after that, and saw two distant hawk shapes to the north! They never came closer, so the rest of the birds continued to eat in peace, with a captivated audience the whole time.

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This gorgeous Blue Jay kept coming back to that specific feeder only for the large in-shell peanuts, which you can see in its mouth!

While we only hold Bagels & Birds once a month, our Windows on the Wild are open anytime the Interpretive Center is open, and there’s always something cool to see. Occasionally, the large Pileated Woodpeckers come to visit the feeders, and some of the deer who live at River Bend teach their fawns to come eat at the bird feeders, especially in the winter, so it’s great to see them up close through the windows. Even wild turkeys occasionally try to eat from the feeders, which sometimes results in breaking the feeders with their large size. Regardless of who visits, there is always something neat to watch!

Every month, Paddington’s Seed & Feed makes a generous donation of birdseed to keep the feeders full, and we are very grateful for their support! If you like watching the birds, consider donating seed too!

Finally, if you’re interested in bird watching but don’t want to wait until the next Bagels & Birds, check out Audubon & The Cornell Lab’s 20th annual Great Backyard Bird Count! All you have to do is count the birds you see for at least 15 minutes on one or more of the 4 days between February 17 and 20. You can do this at a park, at River Bend, or in your own backyard! You can even take pictures and enter a photo contest! Whenever you have made your observations, simply enter your checklist online at http://gbbc.birdcount.org/. This is a great way to be a citizen scientist, and help scientists all over North America collect data for their studies!

Thank you for reading this, and we hope you and your friends and family decide to come visit us next month on Saturday, March 3rd to have a yummy breakfast, chat with a naturalist and other nature lovers, and just have a good time watching birds!

All the best,

Katie

Let Us Help With Your New Year’s Resolutions!

Such a great list!

There's No Such Thing As Bad Weather...

1st

With the New Year starting I am sure many of you are getting started on your New Year’s resolutions and I am excited to announce that River Bend Nature Center is here to help you achieve your goals! Maybe this year you are trying to be more active or maybe it is to spend more time with family and friends, you can do this and more at River Bend Nature Center! We have included below some common New Year’s Resolutions and ways you can work toward these goals at River Bend Nature Center. We wish you the best of luck with your resolutions and hope we can help you achieve them!

#1 Be healthy – Get Fit – Stay Active!

2nd

River Bend Nature Center has 10 miles of trails open year round from 6 am to 10 pm for skiing, snow shoeing, hiking, and biking! Starting this spring after the…

View original post 2,144 more words

Happy 2017!

Happy 2017, nature lovers and River Bend friends! My name is Katie, and I am one of the four School Year Environmental Educators at your awesome local nature center. We have decided to become more active in the blog, and that means bringing you wonderful people cool information and facts about River Bend and nature in general! We will cover topics from trees and fungus to stars and survival, and much more, so keep an eye on this blog and our Facebook page for posts throughout the winter and spring!

In this introductory post, I am just going to give you some quick details about us 4 Naturalists, our passions, and fun facts!

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From Left to Right: Kara, Stephanie, Elsa, and Katie!

Kara, our Education Program Specialist, loves turtles, ants, and skiing. She coordinates the Creciendo Juntos program and Waste Education programs for all 3rd and 4th graders in Rice County! She is always smiling and loves to chat about all things nature, especially turtles.

Stephanie is a STEM School Specialist, which also includes coordinating the many amazing field trips that local schools get to take to River Bend. Stephanie skis to work almost every day, and loves talking about the stars, geology, and just about anything about animals.

Elsa is our other STEM School Specialist, and half of her week is spent at the Cannon River STEM School, helping students and teachers alike incorporate nature into their daily studies. Elsa loves all kinds of bugs, and especially enjoys teaching about edible plants and how to survive in the woods!

And lastly, I am the Community Outreach Specialist, and my coordinating focus is on our Homeschool programs, Birthday Parties, our Animal Ambassadors, and Science Club. I love talking about animal behavior and habitats, growing plants, and citizen science!

Thank you so much for reading this blog, and we’ll see you next week!

~Katie