New Courses, 10K at River Bend’s Fun Run

Zach Hudson

By Zach Hudson, Intern Naturalist

As skiers begin to mourn the vanishing snow our thoughts at River Bend turn to maple trees and the production of maple syrup. In recent years, our maple syrup season has culminated with our Maple Syrup Fun Run 5K run and 1 mile walk event. This exciting gathering has become one of our fastest growing fundraisers, with over 200 participants last year. The year 2013 brings some exciting changes for the Maple Syrup Fun Run, with a new race distance and new courses, as well as real maple syrup for every participant.

Sumac Trail

Sumac trail on River Bend’s south side is part of the 10K course.

Walnut grove's run spectators

Walnut grove’s run spectators

As a runner myself I was especially excited about the prospect of creating new courses and adding a 10k distance to our event.  We decided early on to try to make our new 5k course slightly easier than in past years to make it more appealing to casual runners.  We quickly realized that you can’t make an easy course using River Bend’s trails, but I think what we came up with will be a fun course that should be doable for anyone.  Our 5k will leave from prairie pond and cross the prairie on raccoon to a crossing of Rustad Road.  From there the course will descend to the river along Cherry and Dairy Lane before returning to the road via Rabbit and Teepee Tonka.  Runners will cross the road and complete a rolling final kilometer overlooking upper pond before returning to raccoon to head back to the start/finish line.  A full map of the course is at this link: http://www.mapmyride.com/routes/view/188158516

Dairy Lane Bridge

Dairy Lane Bridge looking to the south side of River Bend.

Since we made our 5k course mellower we decided to use the 10k to take full advantage of all of River Bend’s challenging terrain.  Much of the 5k course is included in the 10k, but with some added bite.  The course opens with a grueling climb up Maple to the walnut grove.  After following Walnut around to the paved section of Raccoon, racers will cross Rustad Road and descend to the railroad tracks via Cherry  and continue on Teepee Tonka to Dairy Lane.  Runners will then cross over the Straight River for a challenging climb to River Bend’s south entrance and a hilly run through the south side of the Nature Center.  After crossing back over the river runners will follow Rabbit under the railroad tracks and around to Arrowhead and Deer before rejoining the 5k course at Rustad Road.  The 10k concludes the same rolling finish stretch as the 5k.  The full course map is here:  http://www.mapmyride.com/routes/view/188171998

One-mile walk starting line

The starting line of the one-mile walk course.

In addition to our new running courses we have also moved our 1 mile walking route. We tried to create a walk that minimized overlap with the running courses while providing walkers with great scenery and views of the running courses. As we were developing the course we realized that moving the walk to the paved trails would make it more accessible to people with mobility issues or parents wanting to push strollers. The route also takes in some River Bend favorites such as Honor Point and Turtle Pond and offers views of the 5K course as the runners climb up the final hill. A map of that route is here: http://www.mapmyride.com/routes/view/177012142.

Maple Syrup Fun Run

Runners coming over the prairie finish line in last year’s Maple Syrup Fun Run.

One sad byproduct of the Maple Syrup Fun Run’s rapid growth is that we have outgrown our capacity for serving pancakes at our annual Pancake Brunch out of Trailside Center. As a result the brunch will take a hiatus this year while we work at finding other facilities for the future. It is possible that a separate pancake event will be held at another time this spring. Since runners won’t get to sample maple syrup on their pancakes the day of the race, we have added sample bottles of Anderson’s Pure Maple Syrup to participant gifts. We are excited to welcome Anderson’s Maple Syrup and Boston’s Restaurant & Sports Bar, RoadID as new sponsors of our event, along with returning sponsors District One Hospital and Reliance Bank. Thank you to our sponsors for helping us make our race possible!

Anderson's Pure Maple Syrup

Participants will get bottles of Anderson’s Pure Maple Syrup as part of their run gift.

Come join us at River Bend Nature Center to celebrate maple syrup and the coming of spring at our Maple Syrup Fun Run 10K/5K/1M. We are excited to see this event continue to grow and improve as River Bend moves into the future, we hope to see you there!

Zach Hudson is an intern naturalist for the River Bend Nature Center, a member supported non-profit dedicated to helping people discover, enjoy, understand and preserve the incredible natural world that surrounds us. Contact River Bend at rbncinfo@rbnc.org or 507-332-7151.

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Dreaming of a Green Christmas

By Caitlin Savage, Intern Naturalist

As the winter season draws near, many people are hoping for a white Christmas, especially due to the lack of snow last year. This year, however, I want to encourage you to have a “green” Christmas! There are many simple steps you can take to make your holiday season more environmentally friendly. Here are a few suggestions:

1. Make your own gifts

Many people struggle to pick out the perfect gifts for their loved ones during the holiday season. What better way to express your appreciation than to put the time and effort into making a gift for someone? Come to River Bend’s “DIY Up-cycled Winter Crafts” event on December 15th from 10am—noon to learn how to make your own winter crafts to give out as Christmas presents (materials are provided). This program is open to all ages and costs $3 per River Bend member, $5 per nonmember, or $10 per nonmember family. Exercise your creative muscles this holiday season! If you’re feeling uninspired, don’t worry – a multitude of ideas are just a “Google” search away. You can find great ideas for homemade holiday gifts on the web.

Food is another great gift idea. Although college students are particularly appreciative of homemade goodies, people of all ages will enjoy this thoughtful present. If you’re not much of a cook, you could consider offering out another service. Give the gift of a free babysitting session to busy family members, or offer to walk someone’s dog for a couple weeks during the cold winter. Remember that many people would appreciate your help in an area you excel in. For example, if you’re good with cars, give someone a “coupon” for you to change their oil. If you’re talented at pottery-making, piano, juggling, or any other skill, offer someone a free lesson.

2. Use more sustainable Christmas trees

Christmas Tree Pick-Up & Recycling

River Bend’s Christmas tree pick-up and recycling program starts in January.

It is a common misconception that a reusable artificial tree is more sustainable than a real tree. In reality, artificial trees use unsustainable resources such as petroleum to manufacture, and additional resources are used to package and ship them. Since they are made of non-recyclable materials, the trees eventually wind up in a landfill, where they will remain for a long time, perhaps indefinitely.

Instead, buy a real tree from a local tree farm. Picking out a tree together is a great opportunity to spend time with family or friends! After the holiday season ends, you can mulch or recycle it. One way to recycle a tree is to bring it into River Bend so we can use them on our trails! For a $10 donation ($15 for nonmembers) we will pick up your tree for recycling, or for $5 you can drop your tree off at River Bend for recycling.

Another option is to buy a potted or balled tree to use. After the holidays are over, you can plant it in your own backyard or donate it to an organization that will plant it.

3. Use alternative wrapping paper

Gift packaging is one of the main contributors of excess waste during the holidays. Consider using alternative wrapping paper this year. Newspaper and magazine pages make excellent wrapping paper. Look for articles that your loved ones might find interesting to decorate their gifts. Brown paper bags can also be used as wrapping paper and decorated to your liking. Fabric scraps are useful to wrap gifts or to make bows and ribbons.

If you would prefer to use actual wrapping paper, purchase paper made from recycled materials. After the holidays end, recycle the used wrapping paper (keep in mind that shiny or metallic paper is non-recyclable, and remove tape from the paper if possible). If you use gift boxes or ribbons and bows, keep them to reuse the following year. You can also save wrapping paper to reuse (although when excited kids are involved, there may not be anything salvageable left!)

4. Decrease energy used by holiday lights

One way to decrease your energy usage for the holidays is by using LED lights instead of incandescent. LED lights use less energy and are cooler to the touch than incandescent lights. However, they are typically more expensive, and some people aren’t as fond of the aesthetics of the LED.  If you would prefer not to use LED lights, try reducing the amount of time that you keep your Christmas lights plugged in. Make sure that you only have them on during the dark hours, when they are most easily visible. Also, consider keeping them off while you are asleep. If you have Christmas lights indoors, make sure to turn them off when other lights in the room are on.

5. Avoid making too much food

Excess food makes up a large portion of the waste created during the holiday season. This can be tackled a few different ways. One option is to make less food. If you always find yourselves with leftovers, cut down the number of servings per dish you prepare, or remove a few of the usual items off your menu.

Many food dishes spark a rich sense of tradition during the holidays, so you may be reluctant to remove any of them from your usual menu. Good can still come out of excess food. Instead of throwing away leftovers, save them to eat throughout the next week. If you aren’t a huge fan of leftovers (you can only have turkey so many times in a week before it loses its appeal), look into donating them to a local food pantry or charity.

Couple snowshowing

Snowshoeing is one of many great ways to spend time with family and friends.

6. Spend quality time with family and friends

Go outside and embrace the winter weather! Get a group of friends and family together to experience the enjoyable and environmentally-friendly activities winter has to offer. Go sledding, build a snow fort, or start a giant snowball fight. Skiing, ice-skating, and snow-shoeing are popular, “green” winter activities. Snowshoes are available for rental at River Bend throughout the winter ($5/member, $10/nonmember; there must be at least 6 in. of snow to rent snowshoes). Or just take a walk and marvel in the beautiful winter landscapes your community has to offer.If you prefer to spend time indoors away from the cold, invite some friends or family over to enjoy some hot chocolate and remind yourself of what the holidays are truly about.

I hope you find that some of these suggestions will help you have a greener holiday season. I’m not advocating that you try all of these things, just choose the ones that work best for you. Even a small change can make a big impact. Happy Holidays!

Caitlin Savage is an intern naturalist for the River Bend Nature Center, a member supported non-profit dedicated to helping people discover, enjoy, understand and preserve the incredible natural world that surrounds us. Contact us at rbncinfo@rbnc.org or 507-332-7151.

Five Questions and Answers About Snow

By Zach Hudson, Intern Naturalist

Freshly groomed ski trails

Freshly groomed ski trails

Winter is my favorite season of all, and my favorite part of winter is the snow. Snow can be quite interesting for a naturalist or anyone interested in nature. There are many things about snow that can help us understand how nature works in the winter, including when, where and how much of the white stuff we can expect to get. So without further ado here are five facts about the stuff that makes winter so great!

1. When does it snow first in Faribault?
River Bend founder Orwin Rustad kept a detailed journal for over 50 years recording the timing of a variety of events in the natural world, including the first measurable snowfall of each winter. According to his journals the earliest snow has fallen here was on September 30 all the way back in 1961. On average though, we can expect to see our first snowfall sometime in early November. Once that first snow falls Faribault receives about 40 inches of snow total over the course of the winter concentrated in the months of December and January.

2. What are some of the historic snowstorms that have hit Faribault?
In addition to recording the start of the snowy season each year Orwin Rustad also kept records of major storm events that occurred in Faribault and other locations in Minnesota. Many people remember the 1991 Halloween Blizzard but, this is far from the only significant blizzard to strike Faribault. Bishop Whipple has accounts from the 1800’s of riding his horse through a horrific snow to reach some of the mission outposts he visited. In addition Faribault saw a single storm that dropped 20 inches of snow in 1982, one of three large storms that year in Rustad’s journal.

3. Where are the snowiest places in the U.S.?
While Faribault and Minnesota in general do receive their fair share of snow we are far from the snowiest places in the USA. Valdez, Alaska averages over 300 inches per year which is about the equivalent of the height of a football goalpost. Excluding Alaska, cities near mountains or large bodies of water have a tendency to get pounded with the white stuff. My hometown of Lander, Wyoming gets over 100 inches of snow every year and Ironwood in Michigan’s upper peninsula receives an average of 180 inches of lake effect snow.

Hoar Frost

Hoar frost on tree branches in 2010.

4. How do snow crystals get their amazing structures?
The structure of individual snow crystals is quite fascinating, and arises from various properties of water. All snow crystals have six-fold symmetry or something close to it. The six-fold symmetry arises from the molecular nature of ice as it freezes. The uniqueness of snowflakes has to do with the varied paths they take to earth from the time they begin to form up in the clouds. Every snowflake starts its life as a simple hexagon and grows branches of various shapes as its external conditions change. No two snowflakes experience the exact same conditions as they fall resulting in unique structures for each flake. You can find more information including some amazing images at this website run by physicists at Cal Tech.

5. What is a true blizzard?
We often think of any major snowfall event as a blizzard, but is that really correct? The answer is no, a true blizzard combines heavy snowfall with strong winds. According to the National Weather Service for a storm to receive blizzard designation it must meet the following criteria: for a time period of at least 3 hours there must be wind to 35 mph or greater and considerable falling or blowing snow, such that visibility is reduced to a 1/4 mile or less. According to these requirements true blizzards are rare; however blizzard-like conditions can be relatively common for shorter time periods.

Zach Hudson is an intern naturalist for the River Bend Nature Center, a member supported non-profit dedicated to helping people discover, enjoy, understand and preserve the incredible natural world that surrounds us. Contact us at rbncinfo@rbnc.org or 507-332-7151.

Fall Programs Recap & Wrap-up — From the Rookie’s Point of View

By Dahna Kreger, Intern Naturalist

For the River Bend naturalist staff, early November can bring either a much welcome break from long hours of wall-to-wall programming; or it can signal the beginning of a lengthy period of down-time that for some may elicit an uprising of pending doom from the gut.  I feel that this primarily applies to me, because of my complete and total inability to sit still for any length of time.  Nonetheless, I am excited to see what projects we will create to keep occupied when not entrenched in the few programs that we’ll be working on during the winter months…

In light of the recent change in our office atmosphere, moving from cyclical chaos and relative calm to one of more consistent calm and placidity, I have luckily been able to complete a blog post during the latter period.  And perhaps because I mourn the end of fall programming, that is the subject to which it is dedicated.

Recap – here is a run-down of the programs we have completed in the last two months:

  • Kindergarten:  Seasons and Senses
  • First Grade:  Homes and Habitats
  • Second Grade:  Seeds of Life
  • Third Grade:  Nature Pyramid
  • Fourth Grade:  Prairie Biome
  • Fifth Grade (Owatonna):  Soils and Erosion
  • Fifth Grade (Faribault):  Aquatic and Ecosystem Research
  • Sixth Grade:  Decomposition

Each brought its own set of challenges, and more frequently, rewards!  As a total greenhorn, I found myself plunged face-first into the fast-paced flow of fall programming at River Bend.  Nervous and stressed at the onset, I quickly built my confidence as a public speaker and group manager.  At least, I think I successfully managed to grow in these areas… my greatest joy of all however- other than the breadth of content and material I learned, in addition to having a fantastic opportunity to work with some wonderfully knowledgeable and exceptionally bright people- was being able to hang out with kids every day, and once again be able to see life through the fresh and curious eyes of a child.  Although I don’t think I had much of a problem doing that anyway, some might argue.

I like to start with favorites, so I’ll begin with my favorite of the fall programs.  I found that I had the most fun with younger kids, and I had a blast working with the kindergarteners during their “Seasons and Senses” program.  For this one, the kids come to River Bend with their class during the fall, winter, and spring; each time visiting their special “kinderspots” which are small areas of either forest or prairie that the groups will track changes with over time using their senses of sight, sound, touch, hearing, and even taste (within reason!).  Each group had an opportunity to visit Turtle Pond.  The clever names always got the kids extremely excited, and it was so fun to see their reactions during the introduction.  The spots were called:  Fuzzy Bunny Boulevard, Raccoon Hollow, Spiderweb Square, and Butterfly AlleyI can’t wait for them to come back in late January!

Another program I found very enjoyable was the Fifth Grade Aquatic and Ecosystem Research.  For this program, students learned how to identify and analyze the different factors that impact the health of an aquatic ecosystem and how to test for them.  The students got to perform some very legitimate tests – including dissolved oxygen, turbidity, pH, and even building filters that might help clean up dirtied water.  A collective favorite though was critter catching, where the students would use dip nets to capture insects and other small animals inhabiting each of the ponds where we conducted the testing.  It was always a highlight to find exceptionally large water beetles in Turtle Pond, or tiny fish swimming around in the hidden ponds tucked away in Owl Valley.   That one really shocked us, since no one really thought that fish could grow in such a small space with very few resources.  We naturalists did encounter a rather intimidating water beetle with one of the groups – it must have had a length of about 3.5 inches, including its pincers.  We kept it in a small container to show the classes coming later that afternoon, but it had escaped into the building at Trailside while we were away at lunch!  I still wonder where it might be lurking…

At this point it becomes very difficult for me to choose favorites, so perhaps continuing in chronological order might be best…

Fourth grade marked the beginning of our fall programming in early September with their study of the prairie biome.  The students were split up into pairs within small groups, and each pair was assigned to a square-shaped plot out in our prairie to conduct some basic scientific tests; such as temperature of soil and plant mass (both in the actual prairie and in the mowed trails), identifying plants and determining how common they are at River Bend, and finally catching insects in nets and jars to see what kinds of critters thrive in our mixed-grass prairie.  Again the students tended to most enjoy the critter-catching.  Sometimes, though, complete and total pandemonium would ensue whenever a bee was found and even caught in a jar… it would often become difficult to restore order after this happened, but we always managed to get everyone back on track.  To achieve this, one of the naturalist staff would “dispose” of the offending bee far off into the woods, or just release it back into the air when no one was looking.

Prairie

The River Bend prairie that the fourth graders surveyed.

Nature Pyramid

The nature pyramid helps us organize the different levels of the food chain. In this program students learned how to categorize the animals they found.

Third graders came next with their study of the Nature Pyramid.  This one was very enjoyable for the children, since it too involved a lot of log and rock rolling to search for insects.  The goal of this unit was to help students better understand each living thing’s place in nature, how abundant they are, and comprehension of the idea that nature is sustained through food chains such as the Nature Pyramid.  My personal favorite was looking for insects in the forest – since we frequently found very large millipedes that children interpreted as freaky and cool.  While they are completely safe to handle, some children opted out of that since it does feel a little funny to have a thing crawling on you that has a hundred tiny little legs, and will likely poo on your hand since it’s scared.  Overall the children did very well at categorizing where each animal belonged on the pyramid, and they especially got a kick when they realized that they too belonged on there – we’re the top dog at the highest tier!

Second graders came to us next for their Seeds of Life Program.  This one was always enjoyable to do – especially early on when we had lots of “poppers” and “hitchhikers” for the kids!  In this unit, we introduce the kids to the idea of adaptations.  That is, things that help a plant or animal survive in its habitat.  We use seeds as examples of different adaptations.  There are four different types of seeds:  hitch-hikers stick to fur, feathers, or clothing to later fall off at a new place; droppers simply fall to the ground, however animals usually carry them to other places; poppers burst from their seed container to spread away from the plant; and flyers are carried through the air by the wind by their wings or feathery parachutes.  Pretty much across the board everyone loved milkweed pods the best – finding the downy fluff scattered across the ground or still encased within the pod.  Of course, there were always those few children who would pluck a whole pod right off the plant and pocket it, and maybe one of the group leaders would discover it later on, or parents much later on at home… but I never really minded this because they loved it so much; how soft and feathery they felt, and how easily they blew away in the wind!  I remember loving that as a child, and even still today it brings me irrational amounts of joy.

Milkweed

Milkweed – flyer
*This is a tricky one; many believe that it is a popper, and while the pod does pop open, the seeds themselves fly out of the pod to distribute themselves.

This brings us to the concluding weeks of our fall programs, in which we had sixth graders and first graders coming to visit us!  The two programs did end up overlapping just a bit, however I always appreciate a little variety in the workweek, so I didn’t mind this at all and I am sure that none of the other naturalists did either.   At this point though I think we were all beginning to get a little tired, and were more or less looking forward to having a break coming up…

Beginning with sixth grade — this unit was all about decomposition, and introducing/reinforcing the concept behind and importance of using the scientific method.  In this unit, the goal was to have students be able to distinguish between producers, consumers, and decomposers; identify the non-living parts of cycles in natures (air, water, sunlight, rocks), and to review a food chain/web — either theoretical or observed that incorporates all the components of a nutrient cycle.  I had a total blast with this program!  I had been anticipating grumpy cantankerous pre-adolescent children giving me attitude and spewing out negativity about whatever I’d try to say to them.  And, I ended up with slightly cantankerous pre-adolescent children who got surprisingly excited about things like moss, lichen, and fungi.  For the program, the students were split up into pairs and groups — of which we had a total of four.  These included fungi, moss, lichen, middens and arthropods.  Of course being the leader of the midden/arthropod group often proved to be a significant advantage when it came to keeping everyone engaged and interested in what you were doing, I found.  On the first day of this unit, my group found a wolf spider and a unique species of millipede that still had a predominantly black body, but yellow and orange legs!

Nerstrand First Graders

Nerstrand first graders – showing off their pretend “squirrel” food caches of hickory nuts and basswood seeds!

Finally this leaves the first graders and their homes and habitats unit.  I know that I’ve said this about pretty much every program so far, but this one was really a lot of fun!  For this unit, the goal was to get the children to understand that a habitat is more than just where an animal can build its home. It is also a certain area where an animal prefers to live, and can find everything that it needs to survive.  An integral part of this program was reinforcing the four things that animals need to survive in their habitats – food, water, shelter, and space.  We went out in groups to investigate “evidence” of an animal’s presence – we asked them, “What would the animals have left behind in their homes or habitats?”  We were looking for things like tracks, scat, fur, feathers, scratch marks from claws, hollows in trees, and even bones.  We did have a couple of places where  we had intentionally hid animal bones – everyone really got a kick out of that!  And just because the kids are so adorable, I am including a few snapshots of some of the groups who came for this program.

Caitlin & first graders

Naturalist Caitlin Savage leading a group of first graders from Lincoln through our prairie!

As I finish this write-up, I have to say that thinking about all these programs that have passed us by has made me a little sentimental… but at least the naturalist staff gets to see everyone again in the spring!  And, after already halfway through the first week of no programming, I am doing well with the decreased activity levels of hectic-ness, and I have to say I think everyone else is too.

Dahna Kreger is an intern naturalist for the River Bend Nature Center, a member supported non-profit dedicated to helping people discover, enjoy, understand and preserve the incredible natural world that surrounds us. Contact us at rbncinfo@rbnc.org or 507-332-7151.

The Top 5 Scary Animals (That Aren’t Really That Scary)

By Garrett Genereux, Intern Naturalist

Assassin Bug

An assassin bug having a bee for lunch! Photo credit Dave Wilson Photography.

During this spooky time of year it is popular to post lists of scary things. Often times these lists feature animals such as the Great White shark or the Grizzly bear – animals that are actually quite frightening when encountered in nature. The five animals I am going to write about are “scary” but they will not get your instinctual-adrenaline pumping. These animals either appear scary or have some type of behavior that is scary, but in reality they pose little threat to us humans.

5. Assassin Bugs

These small (less than 40 mm) insects from the order Hemiptera (true bugs) are real-life vampires. Like their name suggests, they are highly-skilled predators. Assassin bugs employ camouflage coloring, dust, and sometimes even the exoskeletons of previous victims to hide and wait for their prey. They have also been known attack while flying. Once they have caught their prey, they use their straw-like mouth, called a rostrum, to inject saliva into their victim’s body. This isn’t just ordinary saliva; this saliva dissolves the inner tissues of their prey into liquid which the assassin bug then sucks out through the rostrum. There are 7,000 species worldwide. The Assassin bugs that can commonly be found in the prairie here at River Bend are quite benign. However, there are several species that inhabit parts of Central and South America that do feed on the blood of humans while they are sleeping. A few specific species of these blood-sucking Assassin bugs carry Chagas disease which can be fatal.

Wrinkle Faced Bat

It is hard to forget a face like that! Photo credit Evets Lembek.

4. Wrinkle-faced Bat

This fruit-eating bat truly has a face that only a mother could love. Wrinkle-faced bats can be found in several Central and South American countries. The face of the male bat typically has more wrinkles than the female. These skin growths are thought to help direct sound waves to their ears. Also quite strange is that the male bats have a flap of skin on their neck that they can tuck their whole head into. Very interesting to note is that the wrinkle-faced bat’s head is wider than it is tall. This adaptation allows the bat to increase the strength of its bite. Some scientists have conjectured that this allows the Wrinkle-faced bat to eat tough-skinned fruit when soft fruit is not available.

Tailless Whip Scorpion

Just remember it can’t hurt you! Photo credit Brujo.

3. Tailless Whip Scorpion

Although not a scorpion, this arachnid is perhaps more visually startling than its relative. Besides its six walking legs and two pedipalps (the two claw/pincer type legs near the animal’s mouth) it has a long appendage on each side of its body which is the “whip”. These appendages are not actually used as whips, but they do help catch prey. Typically the Tailless Whip scorpion walks sideways with its whips probing in front and behind as it walks feeling around for prey. Once it finds its prey it catches it with the pedipalps which have thornish spikes to ensure the prey does not get away. These arachnids do not have spinnerets or venom. There are 155 species that live in tropical and sub-tropical areas (so nothing to fear here in Minnesota). These animals prefer a humid environment.

Pistol Shrimp

For being so small it sure packs a punch! Photo credit Debby Ng.

2. Pistol Shrimp

Yes, a diminutive, plain-looking shrimp is at number two on this list. So if it doesn’t look frightening, then why is it on this list? Because it can do something quite spectacular that makes me thankful that it is fairly small and lives on the ocean floor far away from here.  The Pistol shrimp, also known as the Snapping shrimp, is a predatory shrimp and has a very unique way of catching its prey. The shrimp has asymmetrical claws, with one of the claws being able to produce very loud (190 decibels) snapping noise that it uses to catch prey and communicate. When there are great populations of these shrimp they can actually disrupt sonar and cause noise pollution in the ocean due to their incredibly loud snapping. Now to the interesting part, how they catch their prey. Typically they feed on small fish and other shrimp. They lay in wait until they sense movement with their antennae. Then they cock back their snapping claw and aim it at their prey. Next it releases the claw (hence the pistol name) and it creates a cavitation bubble (the loud snapping noise creates a pressure difference in the water) which travels towards the prey at upwards of 100 km/hr and at a temperature of 9000 ⁰C. Yes you read that correctly. Nine. Thousand. Degrees. Celsius. And yes, that is hotter than the surface of the sun. This cavitation bubble eventually implodes, effectively and severely stunning the prey which allows the Pistol shrimp to grab it and bring it back to its burrow to feed. This shrimp lives in oceans worldwide.

House Centipede

So terrifying!!! Photo credit AussieBotanist.

1. House Centipede

This centipede is only five centimeters long, which is dramatically smaller than its largest cousin, the Amazonian Giant centipede, which can be up to 35 centimeters long.  However, this centipede can be commonly found in your house, it moves uncommonly fast, and is not pleasant to look at. It may be of consolation that if this centipede is found in your house, it means that it is getting rid of other pests including ants, silverfish, small spiders, and even bed bugs. To catch this prey it moves very fast- up to .5 meters per second. Like many other centipedes, the house centipede uses venom to kill its prey. This species has specialized legs near its mouth that inject the venom instead of using mouthparts. House centipedes have been observed jumping onto their prey, lassoing them with their legs, and even bludgeoning their prey with their legs. Another adaptation that makes this centipede a great hunter is that it has highly developed eyes which are unusual among centipedes, although it still uses its antennae quite a bit. If you are quick enough to squash this arthropod, you better be accurate. House centipedes are notorious for being able to drop appendages that are trapped. However, if you squash too hard the centipede may drop all of its legs and essentially explodes. Originally from the Mediterranean, the House centipede is found almost worldwide. Just hope that the next time you move a piece of furniture you don’t see this creepy crawler speed away to its next hiding spot.

I hope that these animals did not scare you too much. Just remember that most of them don’t live here in Minnesota and that you as a human are much larger than they are so in reality they are probably more scared of you than you are of them. Enjoy Halloween!

Garrett Genereux is an intern naturalist for the River Bend Nature Center, a member supported non-profit dedicated to helping people discover, enjoy, understand and preserve the incredible natural world that surrounds us. Contact us at rbncinfo@rbnc.org or 507-332-7151.

The Ever-Changing Prairie

By Garrett Genereux, Intern Naturalist

One part of River Bend that I feel is sometimes overlooked is the prairie. The prairie here, although small compared to the forest, has a great diversity of plant species. Not only does the prairie have a variety of plants but it also contains an assortment of animals.

Swallowtail Butterfly on Wild Bergamot

This includes many kinds of insects, deer, 13-lined ground squirrels, several other mammals, and quite a selection of birds. Despite all of that perhaps my favorite part of the prairie is that it is always changing. One week you may take a walk  on the Prairie Loop and notice several beautiful species of grasses and flowers blooming, then two weeks later see a whole new set of plants in bloom.

White-tailed Deer

Showy Goldenrod in bloom

Already this year we have seen lupine, butterfly weed, penstemon, wild parsnip (definitely not my favorite plant), purple coneflower, yarrow, golden alexander, and wild bergamot come and go. Right now we are perhaps in the “peak” blooming season. Currently big bluestem, daisy fleabane, snakeroot, tall bellflower, yellow sweet clover, Indian grass, purple prairie clover, bird’s foot trefoil, prairie coneflower, sage, side oats gamma, white prairie clover, thistle, showy goldenrod, black eyed susan, and rattlesnake master are all in bloom! If you are too busy or would prefer cooler weather to go for a hike do not worry! There are still more blooms to come. In the coming weeks several species of aster, gentian, goldenrod, and round headed bush clover will all come into bloom.

Later in the fall, prairie plants will get ready to scatter their seeds. This is summed up beautifully by American naturalist and photographer Edwin Way Teale:  “For man, autumn is a time of harvest, of gathering together. For nature, it is a time of sowing, of scattering abroad.”

Another way that the prairie changes is through controlled burns that mimic the fires from pre-settlement times.  These fires burn the grasses and plants to the soil, but do not damage the extensive perennial root systems that native prairie plants have. This has many benefits. For one, it returns essential nutrients to the soil. Another is that the fire removes invasive species who often do not have as deep of a root system compared to the native plants. Lastly, the fire also keeps trees in check in the continuous battle between the forest and the prairie. Here at River Bend we typically burn sections of our prairie every other year. It is likely that we will be burning this upcoming spring!

Purple Prairie Clover blooming

Please come out for a visit and see the prairie! Walking from the Interpretive Center up and around the Prairie Loop will allow you to see most of the prairie that we have here at River Bend Nature Center. Also please check out the informational brochure on prairie plants, so you have a guide for your walk. There is also a display of current blooms with names and color pictures on the backside of a divider just beside our kitchenette in the Interpretive Center. If you wish to learn more about prairie burns, come to our public program on September 15th, from 9:30-10:30 am, aptly titled “Fires on the Prairie.”

Garrett Genereux is an intern naturalist for the River Bend Nature Center, a member supported non-profit dedicated to helping people discover, enjoy, understand and preserve the incredible natural world that surrounds us. Contact us at rbncinfo@rbnc.org or 507-332-7151.

Running at River Bend

By Zach Hudson, Intern Naturalist

While there are a multitude of ways to enjoy all that River Bend Nature Center has to offer, one of my personal favorites is to take in the sights and sounds while running.  There are numerous ways to link up the ten miles of trails at RBNC; here are four of my favorite runs under five miles complete with maps from mapmyride.com. (Unfortunately mapmyride.com doesn’t include the overlook trail, but any run on walnut should include a trip up overlook.)

1. The Southside Loop (http://www.mapmyride.com/routes/view/118241389)

This run takes you to explore the trails on the south side of the Straight River.  These are some of my favorite trails to run at River Bend.  From the Interpretive Center run along Oak or Turtle until you come to Arrowhead.  Follow Arrowhead along the river to the railroad underpass and take Rabbit to the Dairy Lane bridge, this is one of my favorite trails at RBNC. Once you cross the bridge explore the hilly trails of the south side, I mapped a loop around the outer edge, but all of these trails are fantastically fun.  When you’ve had your fill of the hills head back along Dairy Lane to Teepee Tonka and then Wood Duck to complete your 4.5 mile loop to the Interpretive Center.

2. Short Cherry Loop (http://www.mapmyride.com/routes/view/118253593)

This loop is a quick run of just over two miles that highlights one of my absolute favorite trails at River Bend: Cherry.  Head out from the Interpretative Center down to Turtle Pond and take a moment to look for frogs and turtles before continuing down Oak to Deer.  Run through the woods on Deer to Raspberry until you reach Cherry.  Cherry will take you up rolling hills to the east cemetery of the old Regional Center, for the history enthusiast this can be fascinating place to stop and catch your breath.  From here cross Rustad Road at the Upper parking lot and follow Raccoon back to the Interpretive Center.

3. Long Cherry Loop (http://www.mapmyride.com/routes/view/118260401)

For those runners wanting a longer loop that still takes in Cherry follow the route described above until you reach the upper parking lot.  From there follow Raccoon towards the nature center entrance to Walnut. Turn on to Walnut and follow it to where it intersects with Overlook,  from here take Overlook for a good climb and a fun stretch of single-track or continue on Walnut for an easier run.  Follow Walnut back to Raccoon and then pick up Maple around to Owl.  Be careful on the fast descents on these trails!  Follow the big hill on Owl past our Kids in the Wild play area back to the Interpretive Center for a 3.5 mile loop.

4. Hills and River Loop (http://www.mapmyride.com/routes/view/118268775)

This is my favorite run to do at River Bend I include parts of it almost every time I run at RBNC.  Head out from the Interpretive Center down to Honor Point and the big hill on Trout Lily.  Take it easy on the flats along the river because once we hit Owl this run starts to get tough. Follow Owl up the steep hill to Maple and continue climbing up the big hill and around the corner to Walnut.  Walnut brings you to Overlook where you can run up the stairs to the RBNC’s high point. From here drop down to the Prairie Loop and cross Rustad Road.  Drop down to Arrowhead and enjoy a cruise along the river before one last climb to finish this 3.5 mile loop.

This is merely a sample of the opportunities for running at River Bend, get out and explore all of the trails and find your own favorites.  Combine these loops into longer runs, or link them to the paved city trails.  The most important thing is to get out and enjoy getting fit in the woods and prairies of River Bend Nature Center!

Zach Hudson is an intern naturalist for the River Bend Nature Center, a member supported non-profit dedicated to helping people discover, enjoy, understand and preserve the incredible natural world that surrounds us. Contact us at rbncinfo@rbnc.org or 507-332-7151.

Summer Camp Highlights

Puddle Jumpers campers

Puddle Jumpers campers pose in the forest with their leaders for their official camp photo.

By Miriam Turnbull, Intern Naturalist

The summer at River Bend is flying by!  We are halfway through our camp season, and looking forward to more fun as the summer continues.  Here are some highlights from camps so far:

June 19-22

Goslings (ages 3-4) – Peekin’ and Sneakin’

Some of our youngest campers used special tools to find plants and animals in various habitats around the Nature Center. One camper caught a HUGE tadpole at Turtle Pond – almost 5 inches long!  First thought to be a bullfrog, it was later identified as a green frog tadpole.  The week ended with an exciting safari on the golf cart.

Puddle Jumpers (ages 5-6) – Scales, Feathers, and Fur

This week, campers learned about different types of animals, such as mammals, birds, reptiles, and amphibians.  We looked around River Bend to find different examples of these animals and learn about their behaviors and habitats. At the end of the week, campers had lots of fun building their own animal habitats in Kids in the Wild natural play area.

Water Tigers (ages 7-9) – Wetland Explorers

Clues and treasure maps were used to find and explore River Bend’s wetlands.  Campers visited Turtle Pond, Prairie Pond, and Hidden Ponds, and had the chance to net and observe various wetland plants and animals.

Teen Camp

Teen Camp campers celebrate the sunset over Lake Superior.

June 25-30

Teen Camp (ages 13-16) – Porcupine Mountains Wilderness State Park

Campers this week were able to enjoy a campsite right across the road from Lake Superior.  Other highlights were seeing waterfalls, Lake of the Clouds, and going on a mine tour.

July 10-13

Tadpoles (ages 1-2)

Toddlers and their adults explored different locations, including the prairie and the forest.  Tadpoles had lots of fun getting muddy at Kids in the Wild.

Nature Explorers 1

Nature Explorers work together to dam up the stream flowing into the river.

Nature Explorers 1: On the Prowl (ages 6-9)

Nature Explorers had the chance to plan their own adventures for this week.  Much time was spent making dams and digging in the mud at Kids in the Wild, digging in the sandstone, and exploring side pools and streams of the river.

Junior Naturalists

Campers work on their birch bark boats that they sailed in the headwaters of the Mississippi River in Itasca State Park.

Junior Naturalists – Itasca State Park (ages 10-12)

Junior naturalists journeyed up to northern Minnesota and set up camp near the headwaters of the Mississippi.  One highlight of the week was building natural boats and launching them at the headwaters.

July 17-20

Goslings (ages 3-4) – Animal Adventures

This week, Goslings learned about different kinds of animals at River Bend.  Exciting activities included seeing deer, scattering birdseed, and looking at tiny tadpoles in Turtle Pond.

Puddle Jumpers (ages 5-6) – Creepers and Crawlers

Puddle jumpers learned about different kinds of bugs that live in the forest, prairie, and pond.  Campers had lots of fun looking under logs, netting insects in the prairie, and dipping in Turtle Pond and the river.

Water Tigers (ages 7-9) – Mammal Mysteries

Campers learned about the special characteristics of mammals, and solved clues to learn more about the mammal of the day.  The Mammal detectives were also lucky enough to see lots of mammals while they were exploring, including a doe and two fawns.

Summer Camp

Campers use nets to scoop out plants and animals from the pond and use the bins to view their catch.

This week at River Bend is Nature Explorers 2: Animals Now and Then.  Campers will be learning about animals that lived many, many years ago at River Bend, along with their present-day descendents.

River Bend has more camps coming up soon, and many still have space available! There is a second session of each of the Goslings, Puddle Jumpers, and Water Tigers camps.  Also available are Nature Explorers 3: Park Puzzles (ages 8-10) and Nature Explorers 4: Wild About Water (ages 8-12).  For more information about upcoming camps, check out our website- www.rbnc.org/summercamp, or give us a call at 507-332-7151.

Miriam Turnbull is an intern naturalist for the River Bend Nature Center, a member supported non-profit dedicated to helping people discover, enjoy, understand and preserve the incredible natural world that surrounds us. Contact us at rbncinfo@rbnc.org or 507-332-7151.